AZ Estate Planning News

AZ Estate Planning News

Knollmiller and Arenofsky Trust and Estate Planning

Posts filed under trust

Will My Heirs Have Hurt Feelings Over My Personal Items? Short Answer: Probably

English: Antiques being sold on Colaba Causeway

“The biggest estate-planning mistake is that people think it’s only about the money,” said Marlene Stum, a professor at the University of Minnesota and author of the “Who Gets Grandma’s Yellow Pie Plate?” workbook and website. “When it comes to their personal possessions, they say, ‘It’s just stuff.’ ”

In my opinion, the personal items in a home is often the biggest source of unhappiness among families when a loved one dies.   Without taking the time on how to resolve the distribution of personal possessions, you can unwittingly leave a legacy of rancor and resentment.

Baby boomers surveyed by Allianz Life Insurance Company selected personal possessions six times more often than financial inheritance as important in legacy planning.

Okay, where do we start?  How about asking your heirs what items mean something to them?   Then keep a list and resolve any overlapping interests.

Next, on a sheet of paper, titled Personal Property Distributions, and upon completion attached to the back of your Will, list who gets what and sign, date and number the sheet(s) 0f paper.  While writing the names on the pieces themselves seems like a great idea, it is unlikely supported in the law if there is  a dispute on who gets which items.

If you have a lot of sentimental items, and you do not want to list who receives them, perhaps a third party executor or successor trustee that will distribute the personal items will work better since their decisions will not be treated as biased or personal.
Starting the process early leaves time to work out ground rules and deal with different assumptions and opinions.  And it can be a chance to see the pleasure your treasures can bring to their new owners if you choose to give them the items you do not need now.
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“Only Older People Need Estate Plans”

Français : Enterrement à

Français : Enterrement à (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

It isn’t a surprise to anyone that those typically motivated to do estate planning are those that have their mortality staring back at them.  Examples include clients preparing for travel, life challenging illnesses or individuals in advancing years.

I don’t need to remind anyone that life can be cut short since all of us have been affected by a passing that came too soon and too fast.   In my practice, I’ve had parents pass without making their choice be known for a guardian of their children and recently an individual passed and because she didn’t have a will, it passed to an individual that the rest of the family kept shaking their heads saying “she must be turning in her grave that so-and-so inherited her estate.”

Sure, very few of us like planning for our passing.  But often, it is the things we least want to face that end up giving us the greatest peace once faced, tackled and then resolved.

Give us a call and we will be happy to assist you with the process, make the planning and implementation of your estate plan as simple as possible and will guarantee that the burden that gets lifted off your shoulders will give you great satisfaction.

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Revocable Trusts, and Living Trusts, and Irrevocable Trusts! Oh, My!

Wizard of Oz

But wait, there’s more; there’s Loving Trusts, Family Trusts,  Grantor Retained Trusts and many more.

Let’s start with revocable vs. irrevocable trusts.  These are exactly what they say.  The revocable trust can be changed, amended,  and even thrown away.  The irrevocable trust however rarely can be changed except for very limited circumstances.

The revocable trust is the most common trust, the basis of an estate plan and typically what a client uses in lieu of a Last Will & Testament for the core estate plan.  The irrevocable trust is usually a more advanced estate planning trust IN ADDITION to the client’s existing estate plan (using a revocable trust).  I will wait for a discussion on when to use a irrevocable trust for a future blog.

What about all the other names?  Family Trust, Living Trust, Revocable Trust, Loving Trust, and Grantor Trust are pretty much the same thing. These trusts are great vehicles for holding your assets so that when you become unable to take care of yourself, or pass away, someone you have named can step in and take care of your affairs in your absence.  Great tools to avoid probates, conservatorships, court involvement and the best of all, far more private than a basic will.

If we can explain more, please feel free to call our office at 480-345-0444.

Kevin P. McFadden, Knollmiller & Arenofsky, LLP

 

 

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Estate Planning Mistaken Belief #2

IF I HAVE A WILL, MY FAMILY WILL AVOID PROBATE

historic deeds and probate court

I am unsure how this mistaken belief ever came about since a Will is almost synonymous with probate.

By way of background, using a Will as your primary estate planning document, your estate may be probated. Without a Will, your estate will still go through the probate process, but the state laws of intestacy,  discussed before in this blog, are applied to your estate and possibly overcome your wishes.

Probate is a court supervised proceeding, where your Will is “proven” in court. If the Will is proven to be valid, then title on your assets, after payment of your debts and expenses, can be legally transferred to your heirs according to your wishes.  Since this is a court supervised process, it is also a public process, meaning the full details of your Will are public and available to anyone wishing to view the court records. This includes the information about who your heirs are, where they live, and often the assets of the estate.

Sandusky County Courthouse

As if the public airing of your final wishes and disposition of your assets is not bad enough, notices must be sent out to all parties with an interest in your Will, usually to all family members, to your creditors, and public notices of your death must be posted. This is to notify and allow anyone who may have a claim against your estate the time to file that claim and have it included in the probate process.

Further, for those individuals with property in more than one state, upon death there will not only be a probate process in the state of residence, but also the need for what is known as an “ancillary probate” in each of the other states where property is owned.

Because of this, most people would choose to avoid probate if they could. Why would anyone voluntarily choose to allow their estate to be probated? There are other methods to use, such as using a living trust as your primary estate planning document instead of a Will, which can avoid most of the time, expense and publicity associated with the probating of a Will.

In short, using a Will as your primary estate planning tool will not keep you, or rather your heirs, out of probate. It does mean however, that your probate will likely be more organized than it otherwise would have been had you died without a Will.

Kevin P. McFadden, Knollmiller & Arenofsky, LLP

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What Happens If You Die Without a Will?

Last Will And Testament

This was a column in a local paper that got me thinking that this is actually a very commonly asked question. First, it doesn’t all go the State. It may but this is very unlikely.

Basically, the State of Arizona has written a Will for you if you fail to do one yourself. If your wishes are not the same as the one written into statute, you will need to do a Will, or a Revocable Trust, to spell out your own wishes.

The State’s “intestacy” statute basically states your estate will go to your spouse if you have children that are also the children of your spouse. Otherwise, it is divided between your spouse and children from a prior marriage. If you are unmarried and without children, to your parents, and so on.

If you have remarried, a blended family, have a significant other or have other heirs you want to leave part of your estate to, you need to overcome this statute by creating your own Will or Revocable Trust. It is actually quite simple to do.

Kevin P. McFadden
Knollmiller & Arenofsky, LLP
480-345-0444

 

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Advantages vs. Disadvantages of a Revocable Trust

New Grandchild

Advantages of a Revocable Living Trust

  • Avoidance of probate. In particular, a revocable living trust can avoid expensive multiple probate proceedings when you own real estate in several different states, as well as the publication of the otherwise private financial details of your estate.
  • Avoidance of conservatorship. A revocable trust can avoid the additional cost of a conservatorship in the event of your incapacity.
  • Efficient distribution. A revocable trust can reduce delays in t istributing your property after you die, although delays caused by filing an estate tax return cannot be avoided.
  • Confidentiality. Generally the terms of your living trust are confidential, with only your named beneficiaries and trustee having access to that information.
  • Continuity. A trust can provide continuity of management of your property after your death or incapacity.

Disadvantages of a Revocable Living Trust

  • Expenses of planning. A revocable living trust can be a little more complicated than a will to draft, and asset transfers can take time and can result in additional costs.
  • Expenses of administration. If you appoint a bank or trust company as trustee, you will have fees to pay (though these may take the place of investment advisory fees and other fees you are already paying).  Of course if you do not use these services, this additional expense will not apply.  Setting up a revocable living trust will not eliminate the need for professional services of attorneys and accountants in the future.
  • Inconvenience. Once the trust is established, you must be sure that trust books are maintained and that all assets continue to be registered to the trustee.   Again, this is not a large issue but certainly is something to consider.
  • Unforeseen problems. Revocable living trusts can raise a variety of new problems regarding the ability to borrow against property, title insurance coverage, real estate in other countries, Subchapter-S stock, certain pension distributions, and many other issues. Only a skilled attorney familiar with estate planning can tell you whether, on the whole, a revocable living trust is right for you, your family and your assets.

In this author’s opinion, the advantages far out weight the disadvantages

This is based on an posting by the Oregon State Bar

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Benefits of receiving inheritance in trust over outright distribution

Leaving an inheritance to a beneficiary outright makes the money subject to the person’s creditors, divorcing spouses and of course their own lack of maturity with the funds.

By leaving the inheritance in trust, these concerns can be addressed. While the funds for this beneficiary are held in trust for their benefit, most creditors are unable to attach the trust assets since the underlying assets continue to be treated as the assets of the giver and not the beneficiary.

Another creditor that may be of concern is a divorcing spouse.  While these funds are held in a trust instead of giving them outright to the heir, a spouse will be unable to attach these assets claiming he or she has a right to part of the inheritance.

Most importantly, beneficiaries at all ages can sometimes be less wise with money left to them than the money they earn on their own.  With this in mind, holding the inheritance in trust serves to make the funds available but not so available as the beneficiary can spend all the funds foolishly.

A client can choose to have the beneficiary be his or her own trustee, with a disinterested third-party discretionary trustee, or give full authority to this third party.  They can also decide where the leftover funds may go when the beneficiary dies or let the beneficiary decide.

For more information, call our offices at 480-345-0444. We are happy to discuss.

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